The Birth

“For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” (Mark 10:45).

When it was time for the Duchess of Cambridge to give birth to her first son it was quite a spectacle. Many reporters were waiting outside the hospital for hours making guesses about what could be going on. The TV was flooded with discussion about the new baby. The nation was excited to see the boy that may one day become their king. Yet the birth of Jesus in the bible is the opposite of what was witnessed on that day. No announcement made ona global scale, no state of the art birthing facilities, no reporters following every moment of the birth trying to guess what was happening. Just a husband, a wife, a manger, animals, some shepherds and eventually, some wise men as well. The king of the universe, son of God, the one to whom all angels and authorities submit, born in obscurity.

Yet it is in this obscurity that we understand the King of Kings Jesus will be. His glory comes not from his wealth or high status on earth but in his work of bringing the kingdom of God through salvation from sins. He accomplishes this not by ruling with an iron fist or by being a well-known celebrity, but by laying down his life in service to us. His kingship, his glory, is defined by his service. His redemption is brought to the world through his death and resurrection.

“For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.” (Mark 10:45).

This is the King of the world that loves us now, the one who wields power unknowable yet humbles himself, born in a manger, to save us.

Tim